Rank and Yank / Forced Distribution–Dick Grote: Giving Advice on Bad Reviews—Agree with Poor Rating

Dick Grote has authored another article on “rank and yank,” “What to do when you think your performance review is wrong” (published in the Harvard Business Review (March 7, 2017)). This time the defense of the system is indirect—informing the recipient of a “C-Bucket” rating to accept it. Indeed, as Grote states in the article, nothing the employee argues against the rating is likely to change it.

Because of the calibration meeting, where managers rank employees, changing a rating means changing it for others, given that rank and yank is a rigid, inhuman, and employee-abusive system.

Harvard Business Review and Dick Grote: A Management Consultant that Loves the Process of Termination, Dehumanizing Human Employees; Review of Grote’s Article– “A Step-by-Step Guide to Firing Someone”

This report is like a recipe of planning destruction in an organized way (creating a transition plan; checking that the employee is not fired on a birthday, shortly before a pension is vested, and so on) making it seem normal, but the effect of the employee losing his or her livelihood and income stream is notably absent. The immoral notion that human beings can be acquired, used up, demeaned, and then thrown away pervades the report. The notion that management persons are perfect by virtue of their position alone is illogical.

Dick Grote: “Rank and Yank” Apologist Disagrees with Holacracy. Why? Holacracy Eliminates the Management Class

In a Bloomberg BNA article, “Is a Manager-Free Company a Good Idea?” Dick Grote, the creator of a management-focused and -dependent forced-ranking system (also known as “rank and yank), disagreed with the implementation of holacracy. (Of course, the success of holacracy means the end of the management class; employees will govern themselves.) What was delightful to experience in reading this Grote quote (below) is the wish for Grote to save managers’ jobs while relishing in the deliverance of abusive treatment and pink slips to rank-and-file employees.

Dick Grote: A Comment on the HBS Article, “The Right Way to Fire Someone.” Management Tactic of Transferring Blame to Labor is Unacceptable; Vigilance of these Tactics Obligatory

Knight, Rebecca (2016). “The Right Way to Fire Someone.” Harvard Business Review. February 5. The article, “The Right Way to Fire Someone,” by Rebecca Knight, is in the Harvard Business Review. This article is pro-management, which is not surprising because Harvard Business School published Dick Grote’s book on forced ranking. The core of the anecdotes … Continue reading Dick Grote: A Comment on the HBS Article, “The Right Way to Fire Someone.” Management Tactic of Transferring Blame to Labor is Unacceptable; Vigilance of these Tactics Obligatory

Dick Grote: Rank and Yank, a.k.a. Differentiation, Used Ruthlessly and in Stealth at Vanguard

With this blog’s coverage of Grote’s rank and yank, this manipulative management style was not new, but what did draw attention is Vanguard’s interest in covering up its use of rank and yank. When an organization decides to enforce rank and yank, that organization must reduce “management” to the calibration meeting’s ranking process. The managers no longer manage the business but instead spend time sorting out who is going to be placed in the firing-level rank during the calibration meeting.

Department of Defense: General Schedule May Have a Long Tenure, But Still Effective; Dick Grote-Style Pay-for Performance is a True Failure

The DoD proponents propose undemocratic, unfair, and dictatorial pay-for-performance policies that betray the democratic republic foundations of the country. In addition, the DoD proponents should never forget that the employees are also United States citizens and permanent residents and taxpayers and that agencies have authority through the consent of U.S. citizens and residents.

Dick Grote: “Rank and Yank” at Amazon; Firm Unlikely to Break Cycle of Forced Ranking’s Failure

Furthermore, the expectation of constant availability without compensation is thoroughly abusive. Amazon does not perform it service for customers for free; thus, Amazon should not expect overtime without compensation. The “salaried” designation is being abused, as low salaries are diluted every minute beyond a 40 hour work week.

Dick Grote, Forced Distribution, and the EEOC Compliance Manual: Forced Distribution Must Show Compliance with All Civil Rights Laws and Regulations

Forced Ranking, its main apologist is Dick Grote, is a blunt management tool, one that does not work in an imperfect world. When imperfect human beings, named as managers, deign themselves to be perfect judges of “performance” by virtue of their position and power over other human beings, the result must be tragedy. See, for … Continue reading Dick Grote, Forced Distribution, and the EEOC Compliance Manual: Forced Distribution Must Show Compliance with All Civil Rights Laws and Regulations

Dick Grote: Forced Ranking Procedures Empowers Managers to Take Advantage of Subordinates; Exemplifed in Grote’s Document titled “Performance Appraisal: Solving Toughest Challenges”

Dick Grote advocates for rampant abuse of employees in the forced-ranking process. Specifically, employees are responsible for doing the manager’s job of supervision and of satisfying the whims of their supervisor, and managers are merely expected to pass judgment on their subordinates and then presumably to sit in judgment at the calibration meeting.

Dick Grote and the “C Bucket”: “Messy Performance Reviews” Document Explains Forced Ranking Relies on Abuse of Managerial Power and Denial of Information to Affected Employees

This blog covers “rank and yank” , and its apologist, Dick Grote, because of the raw, deceptive use of managerial authority that forced ranking performance management programs permit in the name of being “tough”. But on whom is this toughness imposed? The vulnerable employee who is left out of the near-conspiratorial management calibration meetings and … Continue reading Dick Grote and the “C Bucket”: “Messy Performance Reviews” Document Explains Forced Ranking Relies on Abuse of Managerial Power and Denial of Information to Affected Employees